Wheeeeeeeeeeee!!!!

A fork-tailed bush katydid nymph nestles in a rose blossom

With its long legs sticking up towards the top of the rose blossom, it looked to me as if this fork-tailed bush katydid nymph had gone down a slide, but its playground was its dining room. We still have a few rose bushes remaining, this one included, but I haven’t decided if they will stay, as while I don’t like them the katydids love them, and I love the katydids. But these bushes are old, decades old, and their thorns are malevolent.

A Tale With No Tail

My sister's dog Sari sleeps in her dog bed

Sari didn’t have the easiest start to her life but then she was trained to be a service dog that could detect when a diabetic’s blood sugar was getting low, which is how she came into my sister’s life. These days she’s retired from service work and the sweet tail-less pup enjoys walks and belly rubs. Although she lives far away in Georgia, she got to meet Ellie a few years ago when my sister visited us in Portland.

Predator v. Predator

A great blue heron pulls a large bullfrog out of the water

Bullfrogs are voracious predators and not native to the Northwest but they are also a food source for a variety of animals that have learned to eat them. This large bullfrog was I think killed by a family of otters that came through earlier, it looked like one of them had caught the frog and eaten its front legs and a bit near the back before leaving. The heron was happy to eat what the otters left, dunking the frog a couple of times in the water (birds like herons and bitterns do this at times with their prey when near water) before getting it positioned in its beak where it could swallow the frog whole.

A great blue heron holds a large bullfrog in its beak

A  great blue heron dunks a large bullfrog in the water

A great blue heron prepares to swallow a large bullfrog